How and why the Crimean Bridge went from being an insignificant link in Russia’s transportation network to a crucial military objective for Ukraine

On Saturday, Russian officials said that the Crimean Bridge, which links the peninsula to the mainland had been destroyed by what was apparently a truck bombing.

Related: The bridge that Connects the Annexed Crimean Coastline – Is BURNING

The bridge was located in Sevastopol.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs issued a warning, stating that the event provided “terrorist character” evidence of the government in Ukraine.

The bomb caused a chunk of the road segment to collapse, and it also started a fire mostly on the railway portion of the bridge, which led to the closure of traffic.

The explosion was in response to threats made by Kiev, which has taken responsibility for an incident that resulted in the deaths of three people.

Can you tell me about the Crimean Bridge?

The bridge that travels across the Kerch Strait is divided into two portions that run parallel to one another. One of these sections is a road with four lanes for automobiles, while the other is a railway with two tracks that can accommodate both freight and passenger trains.

It spans a distance of 19 kilometers (11.8 miles) and has arches that measure 35 meters (144.8 feet) in height to facilitate the passage of ships beneath.

When was it first constructed?

Before 2018, there was no physical connection between Crimea as well as the rest of Moscow due to the absence of any bridges. Shortly after Crimea’s referendum in the aftermath of the coup in Kiev in 2014 to leave Ukraine and join Russia, Moscow disclosed its intentions for the project. The construction required a total of 228 billion rubles (about $3.7 billion) and took four years to complete.

In May 2018, the road segment was opened to traffic, however, the train service did not become fully operational until 2020. At the time, President Vladimir Putin referred to it as “a symbol of Crimea’s reunification with Russia.” Additionally, he referred to it as a driver of the economy on the peninsula.

Why is it such a big deal to have the bridge?

It is a key transport & supply artery since it is the sole bridge connecting the peninsula and the mainland of Russia. This makes it the route that is both the simplest and the quickest for carrying necessary products and gasoline.

The infrastructure has also been used well by typical members of the population. At the beginning of the previous month, the govt said that Crimea, a renowned summer vacation location, had received a record number of visitors, totaling 3.3 million people and that a record number of 1.2 million cars had traveled across the bridge.

Because of this, columns of tanks, artillery cannons, and other large pieces of heavy equipment may be carried in swiftly by rail, which is an additional reason why it is crucial for the military. On Saturday, the Ministry of Defense issued a statement confirming that both land and marine routes would be used to continuously supply the army with supplies.

What actions is Russia doing in response to the explosion?

After Russia began its military campaign in the neighboring nation in February, the lone major civilian airport in Crimea, which was located in Simferopol, was forced to shut. The residents now again have to depend on the ferries, which hastily resumed operations on Saturday.

After the incorporation of four formerly Ukrainian areas into Russia at the beginning of this month, travelers now have access to a lengthier trip option that takes place entirely on land. Officials have said that they want to reroute certain supply lines in order to make use of the recently obtained ‘land bridge.’

How did the citizens of Kiev respond to the explosion?

The Ukrainian capital considers Crimea to be unlawfully seized, and authorities there have already discussed the possibility of destroying the bridge. An advisor to Vladimir Zelensky named Mikhail Podoliak said in August that the overpass would be a suitable target since it is “the major entrance to feed the Russian Army at Crimea.” Podoliak’s comments were made public.

Podoliak said in a tweet on Saturday that the explosion was “the beginning” and that “anything unlawful must be destroyed, and everything plundered must be restored to Ukraine.”

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